Sugar-Crusted Apple Cobbler

From crisp to dumplings to pie, apples are the star of the autumn baking show. This apple cobbler is designed to show off the pure flavors of fresh in-season apples. Its cake-style topping with a sugar crust is the perfect complement to the soft, juicy baked apples beneath. And while we prefer the dish with unadulterated apples during the season, in winter a little lemon juice or boiled cider (and perhaps some cinnamon) is just what you need to brighten your apples’ mellower flavors.

Prep
20 mins
Bake
35 to 40 mins
Total
2 hrs 10 mins
Yield
one 8" square or 9" round cobbler
Sugar-Crusted Apple Cobbler

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Lightly grease an 8” square or 9” round pan.

  2. If desired, toss the apples with lemon juice (or boiled cider) and cinnamon. Place the apples in the prepared pan, pressing them into an even layer. Set aside.

  3. Beat together the butter and 1/2 cup (99g) of the sugar in a medium mixing bowl until smooth and creamy. Add the buttermilk, flour, baking soda, baking powder, salt, and vanilla, then beat again until smooth.

  4. Spoon the batter – it should be rather stiff – over the apples in the pan, using your spatula to spread it into an even layer all the way to the edges of the pan.

  5. Sprinkle the remaining 1/2 cup (99g) sugar over the batter as evenly as possible. Use a small spoon to drizzle/splash the water onto the sugar, letting it soak in; the goal is to get all the sugar wet.

  6. Bake the cobbler for 35 to 40 minutes, until the surface is golden and crispy and a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake topping comes out clean.

  7. Remove the cobbler from the oven and place it on a rack to cool and set for about 30 minutes; the topping will settle during this time.

  8. Serve the cobbler warm, with or without vanilla ice cream.

  9. Cover leftover cobbler and store at room temperature. Reheat in a warm 300°F oven for 10 to 20 minutes. Refrigerate any leftovers.

Tips from our Bakers

  • So many apples to choose from… which variety is best for pie? For great results, pick a combination: see the details in our blog post, The very best pie apples.