Walnut and Raisin Porridge Bread

Walnut and Raisin Porridge Bread

Walnut and Raisin Porridge Bread

Recipe by Andrew Janjigian

Looking for more variety in your breakfast bread? This satisfying multigrain loaf, with its soft, moist crumb, makes perfect slices for popping into the toaster — where its naturally crispy crust becomes even crunchier. A pat of salted butter and dollop of marmalade are natural accompaniments, but don’t ignore this bread at lunchtime: it makes a bang-up grilled cheese, with the walnuts and raisins pairing beautifully with whatever cheese you choose.

Prep
1 hr
Bake
40 to 45 mins
Total
1 day 4 hrs 30 mins
Yield
one 8 1/2” x 4 1/2” loaf
Walnut and Raisin Porridge Bread - select to zoom
Walnut and Raisin Porridge Bread - select to zoom
Walnut and Raisin Porridge Bread - select to zoom

Instructions

  1. To make the levain: Weigh your flour; or measure it by gently spooning it into a cup, then sweeping off any excess. (To measure by volume, see "tips," below.)

  2. In a medium bowl, mix together all the levain ingredients.

  3. Cover the bowl and set aside to rest at room temperature for 12 to 16 hours; overnight works well.

  4. To make the dough: Weigh your flour; or measure it by gently spooning it into a cup, then sweeping off any excess.

  5. In a large bowl, whisk together the cooked oats, honey, water, levain, butter, allspice, nutmeg, and orange zest.

  6. Add the flour and yeast, and mix until the dough forms a shaggy mass, with no dry floury streaks remaining.

  7. Cover the bowl and allow the dough to rest for 30 minutes.

  8. Add the salt and knead by hand in the bowl until incorporated.

  9. Cover the bowl and allow the dough to rest for 30 minutes.

  10. To do a bowl fold: Use your wet hand to grab a section of dough from one side. Lift it up, then press it down firmly into the middle. Repeat this eight to 12 times, rotating the bowl a quarter-turn each time. Cover the bowl and allow the dough to rest for 30 minutes.

  11. Repeat the bowl fold twice more, letting the dough rest for 30 minutes afterward each time.

  12. Add the walnuts and raisins to the dough and gently knead by hand until fully incorporated. Cover the bowl and allow the dough to rest until puffy, 1 to 2 hours.

  13. To preshape the dough: Flour the top of the dough, turn it out onto a lightly floured surface, and gently form it into a rough round. Cover and let rest for 20 minutes.

  14. To shape the dough: Lightly grease an 8 1/2" x 4 1/2" metal loaf pan; a stoneware or glass pan isn’t appropriate here. Gently shape the dough into a smooth log and settle it into the pan seam side down.

  15. Tent the pan with lightly greased plastic wrap or your favorite reusable cover and allow the loaf to rise until slightly puffy, 30 to 60 minutes.

  16. Cover the loaf securely and refrigerate it for 8 to 16 hours, depending on your schedule.

  17. To bake the loaf in a lidded Dutch oven: Set a large Dutch oven or lidded (covered) baker on the middle rack of the oven. The Dutch oven needs to be large enough to hold an 8 1/2” x 4 1/2” loaf pan; if you don’t have a Dutch oven that large, skip to step #22.

  18. Preheat the oven to 450°F for at least 30 minutes with a rack in the center.

  19. Remove the loaf from the refrigerator. Using a lame or sharp knife, make a single 1/4” deep slash lengthwise down the center of the loaf. Using a mister, spray the top of the loaf with water and top with the chopped oats.

  20. Remove the preheated Dutch oven and set the loaf pan inside it, cover with its lid, and return the whole thing to the oven.

  21. Immediately reduce the oven temperature to 425°F and bake the covered loaf for 20 minutes. Remove the Dutch oven and carefully return the loaf (in its pan) to the oven rack. Bake the loaf for an additional 20 to 25 minutes, until the top is a deep golden brown. Proceed to step #27.

  22. To bake the loaf without a Dutch oven: Preheat the oven to 450°F with a baking stone or steel placed on a middle rack. Allow the oven to preheat for at least 30 minutes to ensure it’s thoroughly heated.

  23. To add steam to your oven: While the oven is preheating, place an empty cast iron skillet on the lowest oven rack, below the stone or steel. If possible, adjust the stone and pan so that the skillet isn't directly under the stone, making it easier for steam to reach the baking bread.

  24. Remove the loaf from the refrigerator. Using a lame or sharp knife, make a single 1/4” deep slash lengthwise down the center of the loaf. Using a mister, spray the top of the loaf with water and top with the chopped oats.

  25. Place the loaf in the oven and pour about 1 cup of warm water into the skillet. Steam will billow from the pan upward to envelop the bread; be sure to wear good oven mitts to shield your hands and arms. Quickly close the oven door to trap the steam.

  26. Immediately reduce the oven temperature to 425°F and bake the loaf for 40 to 45 minutes, until the top is a deep golden brown.

  27. Remove the loaf from the oven and transfer it to a rack to cool for 5 minutes. Remove it from the pan and return it to the rack to cool and set completely before cutting, 3 to 4 hours.

  28. Storage information: Store leftover bread, loosely wrapped, for several days; freeze for longer storage.

Tips from our Bakers

  • Because the volume of cooked oats here is so small, it’s easiest to make a large pot of it for breakfast and reserve what you need for the loaf. Make the oatmeal however you like, using a 1:4.1 ratio of steel-cut oats to water by weight (or 1:3 by volume) to keep the hydration of the dough precise. If you like a looser oatmeal porridge, thin it out with water or milk after setting aside what you need for the recipe.

  • In warmer months (or when your indoor temperature is 70°F to 75°F), the liquid should be 80°F to 85°F. In cooler months (when your indoor temperature is around 65°F), use 100°F to 110°F liquid. The DDT (desired dough temperature) at the end of mixing is 75°F to 80°F; place the dough somewhere warm to maintain this cozy temperature while it rises. Here are ideas for how to set up the best rising environment: Where to put dough to rise.

  • This recipe was developed using metric weights, and for best results we recommend measuring by weight. However, we recognize that some bakers prefer to work with volume measurements. So while we strongly recommend measuring by weight, volume approximations for the recipe's ingredients are listed below. Please be sure you understand how to measure your flour the King Arthur way before you start.

    Levain
    1 tablespoon ripe (fed) sourdough starter
    1/3 cup + 1 tablespoon King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
    3 tablespoons + 1 1/2 teaspoons water, at room temperature

    Dough
    1 1/8 cups cooked steel-cut oats, at room temperature
    1 tablespoon + 1 1/2 teaspoons honey  
    2 tablespoons water, at room temperature  
    all the levain (above)  
    2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted  
    1 teaspoon allspice  
    1/4 teaspoon nutmeg  
    1 tablespoon orange zest (zest of 1 medium-large orange)  
    1 3/4 cups + 1 tablespoon King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour  
    1/8 teaspoon instant yeast, optional   
    1 1/4 teaspoons salt  
    1/2 cup walnuts, lightly toasted and coarsely chopped  
    1/2 cup raisins, packed
    2 tablespoons steel-cut oats or rolled oats, chopped to a sandy consistency in a spice mill, food processor, or blender